What’s on my desk?

After spending all this time at home, I’ve discovered I’m really suited to it. I’ve moved all my training courses online and finally, after fifteen years of living here without an office, I worked out I don’t actually need one. I just need a space for a desk and a chair. And with a bit of jiggery-pokery I’ve created that space in the living room…next to the dog food freezer! (Living in a wonky cottage, you get used to things ending up in wonky places).

And so began the search for a chair and a desk.

I didn’t want a traditional bulky office chair, I wanted something comfortable and stylish that would store away easily under the desk, and fit in with my preferred modern rustic/industrial style. And thanks to fellow interiors bloggers, I sourced this dining room chair from Barker and Stonehouse, a company who, amongst other initiatives, are putting the planet first through their Trees4Trees project, supporting forestry restoration, (a cause close to my own heart).

Chair from Barker and Stonehouse

Sourcing a custom made desk was surprisingly easy. During the pandemic, one of my friend’s sons and his wife started their own Rustic Desk Company, and I’m now the proud owner of a lovingly made desk, using reclaimed scaffolding planks, and hairpin legs, which fits perfectly into the space.

Custom made desk from The Rustic Desk Company

Add in an old brick mould for storing essential items like post it notes, pens and a note book, a small vintage flower pot, and throw a bright orange cloth over the freezer, and the space is instantly more personal.

I spend more and more time at my desk these days, doing everything from running my coaching and listening workshops via Zoom, to working on this blog. Because of this, my workspace is constantly changing. Holding the clutter at bay is challenging, so I prefer to keep nearby only a few quality items that serve multiple purposes over a stockpile of things I might never need.

Published by Angela Watson

I write, talk, and have heartfelt conversations on the vulnerable path to insightful transformation, supporting the planet in remembering who we are and how to listen.

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